Ginninderra

Ginninderra Project Team – Staff spotlight on Dr Anita Hill

We are very pleased to announce the appointment of Dr Anita Hill as the Executive Science Lead of the Ginninderra Project.

Dr Hill will be leading the integrated science program to be undertaken at Ginninderra.

“The Ginninderra Project allows CSIRO and our partners to use our science at scale in the development of an urban environment that benefits the community,” said Dr Hill.

“The development of our Ginninderra site will allow CSIRO’s science and that of our partners to be delivered through a series of housing and construction industry science projects to establish an integrated urban environment at appropriate scale,” said Dr Hill.

“Success would be the application and testing of that knowledge to deliver Australia’s most liveable community focused on sustainable living and wellbeing. We will develop and test platforms that will be shown to improve the liveability and sustainability of our communities. These platforms can then be applied to other developments.”

Dr Hill has been a valued member of the CSIRO team for the past 20 years, with a research focus on materials and process engineering. She is currently the Executive Director of Future Industries at CSIRO which includes Manufacturing, Health and Biosecurity and CSIRO Services. She also serves as Chief Scientist for CSIRO.

In 2014 and 2015, during the transition of the CSIRO chief executives, she served as acting Chief Executive. Previously she was Executive Director of Manufacturing, Digital Productivity, and CSIRO Services, and before that Executive Director of Manufacturing, Materials, and Minerals.

Prior to that, she was Chief of CSIRO Process Science and Engineering and an Office of the Chief Executive Science Leader. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering (ATSE) and of the Australian Academy of Science (AAS). She is on a number of Advisory Boards.

Dr Hill is looking forward to working on the Ginninderra Project.

“In my role, I hope to achieve integration of a number of capabilities into a testbed at scale for science, technologies and engagement models. There are opportunities for the application of environmental, energy, water, digital, urban design, biodiversity, social and material manufacturing sciences in the housing and construction industry to deliver affordable and environmentally sustainable housing and communities.”

Celebrating NAIDOC Week at Ginninderra

Last Thursday, members of the community and Ngunawal custodians came together to better understand and protect important Aboriginal cultural heritage at Ginninderra.

As part of NAIDOC Week 2017, the Mulanggang Traditional Aboriginal Landcare Group, Ginninderra Catchment Group and CSIRO invited members of the Canberra community to learn about the rich cultural landscape of our CSIRO Ginninderra property and the ways of helping to look after country.

The event was attended by 17 members of the community and commenced with a Heritage Interpretation Walk, led by Ngunawal custodian Wally Bell. Wally spoke about the significance of Ginninderra Creek and how native vegetation was used for the provision of food and medicine. He then took us to several scar trees on the site and discussed how the bark was often used.

“The Ngunawal people’s traditional country contains many sites of Aboriginal significance due to our occupation of this area for over 21,000 years,” said Wally. “An experienced Ngunawal descendent can provide an interpretation of the local Aboriginal cultural practices and the cultural landscape.”

“Aboriginal people’s connection to country has come from our belief systems involving the ability to feel at one with the natural environment for thousands of years, if we care for the country the country will care for us.”

The Heritage Interpretation Walk was then followed by a community planting activity where participants, led by the Aboriginal Green Army, helped to restore the shrub layer in a patch of Box-Gum Grassy Woodlands on the site.

“Replanting a shrub layer, together with restoring native grasses, maintaining fallen logs, mature trees, hollows and nesting sites, will help bring back more of the birds that have retreated along with the decline in area and quality of remnant woodlands,” said CSIRO Land and Water ecologist and woodland expert, Jacqui Stol.

Thanks to the 17 members of the community that attended this NAIDOC event and the combined efforts of 100 volunteers and the Green Army over the past few months, 3,500 shrubs have now been planted at Ginninderra.

If you are interested in future events like this, you can register to receive our CSIRO Ginninderra newsletters or keep in touch with Ginninderra Catchment Group and Landcare.

The Aboriginal Green Army helped to restore the shrub layer in a patch of Box-Gum Grassy Woodlands on the site.

 

Project update – July

Much of our focus over the past month was on how the cultural and ecological values of the Ginninderra site can be protected in the future.

Last week, the Mulanggang Traditional Aboriginal Landcare Group, Ginninderra Catchment Group and CSIRO invited members of the community to celebrate NAIDOC Week by learning about the rich cultural landscape in the Ginninderra area and helping to look after country.

The Heritage Interpretation Walk, led by Ngunawal custodian, Wally Bell, presented a great opportunity to discover the Aboriginal heritage and cultural values of the site.

The walk was followed by a community planting activity where participants, led by the Aboriginal Green Army, helped to restore the shrub layer in a patch of Box-Gum Grassy Woodland. In total, 17 members of the community planted over 180 shrubs on the day. Combined with the community planting days held in May, 3,500 shrubs have now been planted – a fantastic achievement by all involved!

If you are interested in future events like this, make sure you are registered to receive our CSIRO Ginninderra newsletters or keep in touch with Ginninderra Catchment Group and Landcare.

This month we also shed more light on CSIRO’s ambitions and the positive impact we anticipate from the Ginninderra venture.

Whilst many of the finer details of the urban development at CSIRO Ginninderra will not be clarified until a development partner is confirmed and a Development Control Plan is finalised, ongoing community engagement will continue. The earliest that any development could commence on the site would be in 2019.

CSIRO’s ambition is that the Ginninderra venture will help to advance the science and innovation that underpins sustainable, liveable and resilient cities, bringing a stream of benefits to the ACT and the nation, as well as generating revenue to support Australian science.

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